Yesterday, President Trump signed an executive order undoing many Obama-era regulations targeted towards coal power plants:

President Trump moved Tuesday to unravel a host of energy regulations imposed by his predecessor, targeting in particular the Obama administration’s signature program that was intended to curb carbon emissions – but blasted by Republicans for hurting the already-struggling coal industry.

With a sweeping executive order signed at EPA headquarters, Trump initiated an immediate review of the Clean Power Plan, which restricts greenhouse gas emissions at coal-fired power plants. Surrounded by coal miners, the president described that plan as a “crushing attack” on workers and vowed to nix “job-killing regulations.”

Predictably, the Malthusian predictions came quickly from the left.  Michael Moore started off the show, stating that Trump’s signature alone would be “the day the extinction of human life on earth began”:

He was hardly alone.  CNN’s Van Jones jumped in on the act too, making a similar proclamation:

Zerohedge summed up an obvious contradiction in Moore’s tweets:

So to be clear, global humanity is destined for extinction because America decides to unwind some burdensome regulations? Perhaps we should be more worried…

Judging his remarks literally, it seems the liberal fanatic believes that historians will survive the coming human extinction (in order to mark the event).

Yes, according to Michael Moore, an EPA regulation will be the death knell in carbon emissions that marks the change in the planet’s ecosystem, and not heavy carbon emissions from nations such as China and India (who are obviously not affected by an EPA decision) or any other unnecessary and/or excessive carbon pollution emitted into the planet’s atmosphere.

And “excessive” needs to be mentioned in the same breath as “hypocritical” when describing Moore’s own personal habits when it comes to “emissions”, as The Washington Times exposed in 2011:

Mr. Moore is a jet-setting multimillionaire living a life of luxury, leisure and fame. He travels in a private plane and a fleet of SUVs. He is completely detached from the workers he claims to defend. In fact, he has misrepresented almost every facet of himself in order to forge a false “little guy” persona. As Peter Schweizer convincingly documents in his superb book, “Do As I Say (Not As I Do): Profiles in Liberal Hypocrisy” (Broadway Books, 2005), Mr. Moore is a fraud.

As The Daily Mail detailed, “detached” is indeed the best way to describe Moore, who owns a $2 million home on a lake in Michigan, as well as a Manhattan apartment on Park Avenue:

Pricey: Michael Moore's sprawling second home on Torch Lake, Michigan has been valued at around $2 million

The documentary film maker owns the luxurious lakeside escape in addition to his pricey Manhattan residence.

The spacious 10,000 sq ft property is a far cry from the scene of tightly-packed tents near Wall Street in New York City.

I can only imagine what Moore’s “carbon footprint” works out to.  Certainly not as much as Al Gore, who released a trailer to his sequel to “An Inconvenient Truth”, titled “An Inconvenient Sequel”, shortly after Trump signed the EPA order.  The Daily Caller pointed out that all of Gore’s predictions from his first movie were completely wrong, but they failed to point out the hypocrisy on the behavior of Gore himself:

Al Gore is arguably better known for his environmental activism than the eight years he served as Vice President. Yet Gore owns a 20-room and pool house mansion in Nashville, Tennessee that used 221,000 kilowatt-hours of energy in one year–more than 20 times the national average of 10,656 kilowatt-hours. According to the Beacon Center of Tennessee, his utility bill would be roughly $30,000 a year, more than the median income of Nashville residents.

His private jet and limo use has drawn widespread criticism for hypocrisy, as did his $500 million sale of his television network Current TV to Al Jazeera – a media organization backed by Arab oil money. Gore even had the gall to go after other networks for being “sponsored in part by oil, coal and gas companies” in his latest book The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change.

Speaking of “Arab oil money”, why hasn’t Van Jones or Michael Moore brought up the behavior of the Saudis and their monster motorcade for their leaders?

Fast forward to this week, when the same King Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud landed in Japan, leading to largely to the same reaction, namely people stunned at the size of his delegation and his 500 tons of luggage. The king made quite an entrance, descending from his plane on one of his two golden escalators. The four-day visit, which began Sunday, is part of the Saudi royal’s month-long Asia trip, as the kingdom looks to diversify its economy from oil dependency. Saudi Arabia is Japan’s largest oil supplier.

The king’s delegation arrived in Japan on 10 aircraft and according to the Japanese press, an entourage so large even Japanese government officials didn’t have an accurate number of how many people to expect. In preparation for the royal visit, 1,200 rooms in Tokyo’s best hotels were booked for the delegation.

King Salman appears to have upped his game since visiting the US and, most recently, Indonesia, where he brought two limousines with him. In Japan, an entire fleet of up to 500 limousines were sourced from around the country according to RT.  “Maintenance costs for luxury models are high and there is little constant demand for such vehicles,” a limousine industry insider told Asahi Shimbun. “Because we are unable to secure the needed number only in Tokyo, we are gathering the vehicles from Kanagawa and Saitama prefectures as well as the Tokai region.”

While he was in Indonesia, the king also had a special toilet built for him inside a mosque, and another inside the House of Representatives.

Take note, private flights can use up to 37 times the personal carbon emissions of commercial flights.  Alas, you’ll find nary a climate change proponent who takes issue with the excessive emissions generated with their own convenience in aviation.

But still, nothing is worse than what took place at the Davos World Economic Forum and the Paris “Climate Accord” in 2015.  The Davos conference consisted of over 1,700 private jets flying into the Swiss city:

A squadron of 1,700 private jets are rumbling into Davos, Switzeralnd, this week to discuss global warming and other issues as the annual World Economic Forum gets underway.

The influx of private jets is so great, the Swiss Armed Forces has been forced to open up a military air base for the first time ever to absorb all the super rich flying their private jets into the event, reports Newsweek.

“Decision-makers meeting in Davos must focus on ways to reduce climate risk while building more efficient, cleaner, and lower-carbon economies,” former Mexican president Felipe Calderon told USA Today.

Davos, which has become a playground of sorts for the global elite, is expected to feature at least 40 heads of state and 2,500 top business executives. Former Vice President-turned-carbon billionaire Al Gore and rapper Pharrell Williams will be there as well; each plans to discuss global warming and recycling respectively.

If you think that display of hypocrisy wasn’t enough, the Paris conference, where global leaders hammered out an “accord” on “climate change” was held in the business center of an airport exclusively catering to private jets:

The 40,000 diplomats, politicians, activists, and journalists expected to attend the UN climate summit in Paris will be spending two weeks at an airport. And not just any airport. Dedicated exclusively to private jets, Paris Le Bourget is the busiest private jet hub in Europe.

Ordinary people don’t descend from the clouds and touch down on its consecrated runways. That experience is reserved for royalty, rock stars, and the conspicuously consuming super rich. Offering quick takeoffs and landings, Paris Le Bourget (aka LBG) is “the premier choice for private flights” in and out of the French capital.

Equipped with more private terminals (eight) than anywhere else in the world, it caters to the “ultra high net worth traveller” desiring an open-air terrace or a children’s play area. Patrons who aren’t met by chauffeured limousines can drive away in Porsche rental cars.

If they were so concerned with “saving the planet” and “reducing carbon emissions,” shouldn’t they have conducted this conference without traveling, perhaps via video conference or telephone?

Or perhaps, that wouldn’t be an ample enough platform for them to privately discuss how to continue traveling in private jets while making sure the rest of the planet pays exponentially more just to get to and from work, all in the name of “saving the planet” from the “carbon emissions” that will kill us all, with of course, the notable exception of the historians Michael Moore mentioned.  If you need a list of places to start reducing emissions before you ever consider a “carbon tax”, there’s already a long list of them.

But don’t worry about it – “climate change” is all Trump’s fault, and he’s solely to blame because he rolled back some regulations.  Nothing to see here folks, move along.  

Take note, “climate change” proponents; it is far easier to take you seriously if you lead by example instead of continuing on your charade of hypocrisy.